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-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
won this election by a 50-48% margin. that may go up to around off 51-48 when california comes in california's last time to wipe weeks to count its votes. account with five cars in brazil but i'm not sure what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, an
won this election by a 50-48% margin. debts may go up to around it 50-48 when the folks in california command and last time it took five weeks to count their votes. they count them in five hours in brazil so i'm not sure why california's less technologically advanced but there we are. all these figures are incomplete as they replied -- it appears obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage and out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is the current ahead in the miami-dade county. people are are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida his electoral vote victory is 332-206. bush was 51-48 margin in 2004 india 286 votes and obama was slightly less it appears against 332. i think there is a certain structure of demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered into large metropolitan areas and in particular neighborhoods and they give them a craft an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
states like the university of california with what has been the premier example of planning the master plan for the last 50 years. we have the state university of new york which kind of pulls together a lot of different philosophy, then you have michigan, and michigan since the frontier days has selected as its design principal anarchy and what that means is that each of the 15 campuses, public campuses in the state have constitutional autonomy. we have no umbrella organization that philosophy has allowed the state over the last century and a half to develop one of the finest higher education systems and the country with one of the lowest levels of support. actually the state of michigan didn't provide any support at all for higher education until the late 19th century. it spent all of the money that it retained from selling land and kept it and didn't give it to the university. the university of michigan has learned from that and consciously over the last several decades has redesigned itself to be loosely coupled adopted system will and what i mean by that is through a variety of ste
in a place in california. i actually worked on another story about the bohemian grove so i know the place well. >> host: a men's club? >> guest: all men, 2,000 men together at a summer camp, and they do it every year as there was a bohemian club in san fransisco hosting this con fab of corporate decision makers, government luminaries, diplomats, very, very important people, probably the equivalent today of, you know, some of the big events that happen in aspen, and out, you know, when you see folks in shirt sleeves rubbing elbows with each other. jackson, actually, was coming out in august of that year, 195 #, to -- 1952, to do that. his professor said, first, he asked jackson, there was a ground breaking of the law school, will you speak? jackson agreed. then the professor surprised rehnquist saying i'm going to arrange for you to meet him. the interesting thing is that rehnquist did meet him, and method with jackson, and jackson just kind of didn't even interview him. rehnquist had a swedish an sees rights movement, -- ancestry, which he talked about always, and so jackson got off on a
of town meetings and they work incredibly well here. and california is other traditions people can build on. but if they can look inside in order to be a valuable process chemists and he needs to be inclusive, deliberative and needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a firmer are people too sad, you know, here's how we can do it in our area. but enough to to have town meetings and apples. we cannot larges and some other process in california piece of people can take the installation and use it wherever they are to the democratic possibility that rises up locally and hopefully in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. i am a librarian for the vermont historical society. we are in the fault of vermont history center. we have a photo album created by a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of vermont troops during the civil war. he presented the supplements u.s. in 1863 after he had returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters in camp, but also some other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that of
. when he retired, he had health insurance from his employer in california, and then he had a massive heart attack and surgery, and they canceled his insurance. my very conservative republican brother who had no use for social programs started counting the days until he was eligible for medicare. that was the only place he could turn. what was at stake were all of the savings he put together for his family. so we would talk on if anybody doesn't talk about a later eligibility age for medicare, what i want to hear is the assurance and guarantee that people like my brother will have access to affordable health care and insurance during any interim period of time from retirement and to actually qualify for medicaid. and intelligent that, i'm skeptical. i want to see more before. let me also say when it comes to medicare that their savings to be had there. savings that were brought up by the simpson-bowles commission to i will go through it, but savings that will not compromise the care and benefits to beneficiaries, but can lead to real efficiencies and delivery of health care. award abo
, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort of in the middle, 48, 49% job approval rating for much of this year, and about 1.5% growth, we a
to regulate the means of production of our agriculture products. a state like california might be fine that has defined a is coming to california shall be raised by hansen student cage size. start out being free range. nancy pelosi impose free range hens from exum re- -- in the captors in the building is remember. that california agenda violates the commerce clause of the constitution that where interstate commerce is regulate exclusively by congress, not the state. and our founding fathers understood but it needs to be stuck. i did put an amendment on the farm bill called the pike and mimic to protect interstate commerce an amendment which prohibits the states from regulating the means of production of our act product but there's a list that exists in the code. so that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that somethi
pipeline, particularly in various parts of the country, but i look at california where we have such immense success. two women senators. we have a freight -- great female delegation out there but we also have folks who have been there for 20 years. many are elected 20 years ago. how long are they going to stay? are we prepared for that? that is our next piece and we will be. >> great. this was sort of a perception in some parts of the country this was a good year for women because a couple of men said a couple of dumb things. dawn, is that true? was this about a couple of men saying a couple of dumb things? >> they did say dumb things, let's be clear but this year of the woman part because i think that goes to it i pick up on your analogy, this year women went viral. the same way the media landscape is fractured. i think you could say this was the year of the woman candidate part two. this was the year of the younger woman. this is the year of the diverse woman. this is the year of women's uteruses. it was a lot of different levels of women got involved in a way that i think 20 years ago it
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14